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OSAC

The Overseas Security Advisory Council

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Who is OSAC?

The Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) was created in 1985 under the Federal Advisory Committee Act to promote security cooperation between American private sector interests worldwide and the U.S. Department of State.

The OSAC “Council” is comprised of 34 private sector and public sector member organizations that represent specific industries or agencies operating abroad. The member organizations designate representatives to serve on the Overseas Security Advisory Council to provide direction and guidance to develop programs that most benefit the U.S. private sector overseas. The Department of State’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) implemented the following recommendations for OSAC: to create the OSAC website, to create a Country Council Program, and to develop a Research and Information Support Center (RISC). A primary goal of OSAC is to develop an effective security communication network, consequently, OSAC invited all U.S. businesses, academia, faith-based groups, and non-governmental organizations to become constituents. There is no cost involved with OSAC constituency.

Authority

The Council is established under authority of the Secretary of State pursuant to 22 U.S.C. § 2656 and in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended, 5 U.S.C. App., and its regulations, 41 C.F.R. Part 102-3. The approval of this Charter by the Under Secretary for Management constitutes a determination by the Secretary of State that the activities of the Council are determined to be in the public interest and are directly related to overseas security functions of the Department of State

History

The increase in terrorism over the last 30 years and the continuing threat against U.S. interests overseas has forced many American companies to seek advice and assistance from the U.S. Government, particularly the State Department. In 1985, a handful of chief executive officers from prominent American companies met with then Secretary of State George P. Shultz to promote cooperation between the American private sector worldwide and the U.S. Government on security issues. The subsequent establishment of the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) has developed into an enormously successful joint venture. Today, over 5,000 U.S. companies, educational institutions, faith-based institutions, and non-governmental organizations are OSAC constituents. OSAC provides a forum for sharing best practices and provides the tools needed to cope with today’s ever-changing challenges and security-related issues abroad.

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